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Subspace radio just around the corner?

7 June 2017

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light... right?

Well apparently that's not always the case.

Let's talk about quantum entanglement for a moment -- or "spooky action at a distance".

According to the experts, the effects of quantum entanglement travel at 10,000 the speed of light so you'd think they'd violate Einstein's theories -- right?

Well, like so many things in the quantum world, this is both true and false at the same time.

Yes, quantum entanglement operates at way-beyond the speed of light but, because it is impossible to send information (in the classical sense) by way of QE effects, the immutable speed-limit isn't really broken at all.

Confused?

Well welcome to the world of quantum physics, where everyone is both confused and enlightened at the same time -- probably :-)

I have a feeling that it's only a matter of time before we're able to exploit the unique quirks of the quantum world to transmit information in breach of the 'C' limit.

Why do I believe that?

Because, in the quantum world, anything is possible (and impossible at the same time).

But seriously, my take on the quantum world is a bit different to that of most well educated, intelligent researchers. I guess that means I'm ill-informed and a bit stupid, handicaps I'll have to live with I guess.

However, the way I see the quantum world is not as a very small version of the world most of us are familiar with but (as I've suggested before) as a seething sea of temporal displacements. These displacements, or "time domains" make it possible for a single piece of matter to seemingly exist in two places at once.

The reality is that it doesn't exist simultaneously in two places at once -- it actually only exists in one place at any given time but because of the different time domains, we see it twice. One of those instances may be at t+0 and the other may be at t+10 but, because of the temporal shifts involved, they both appear to be "here and now".

This also explains how particles appear to pop in and out of existence. They never actually disappear -- they simply move into a different time domain and disappear from where the "are" to where they "were" or "will be" -- depending on whether the domain they enter has a positive or negative temporal displacement.

Sound confusing? Good, that means you're still in the quantum world.

So the universe around us is composed, at a quantum level, of subatomic particles and time domains that are equally microscopic. These particles not only have a position in the three physical dimensions but also a time domain associated with them which can (and will be) displaced from the median. In effect, at a quantum level, time is "fizzing" with these domains which jump between past, present and future. The overall (average) of these displacements is the "now" we know at a macro-level.

Sounds crazy right?

Never the less, it is a theory that explains the issues of probability, uncertainty and entanglement with great elegance.

My theory is that a quantum entanglement isn't actually two separate particles linked over distance -- it is the very same particle displaced in time by virtue of the domains it exists in.

So what about sub-space radio -- the ability to obtain instant communications over massive distances?

Well that's simple. We take a particle and we export it to the destination.. we then bounce it back and forth between two of these quantum-level time domains. One domain is "when" it was at the origin, the other domain is "when" it was at the destination. By alternating it between the two domains it can appear to be in both locations at once and any change made to the particle in one location will be reflected by an instantaneous change to it at the other.

The particle makes only one physical journey through space but it makes as many trips between the microscopic time domains as are needed to transfer the information. In effect, we're sending it back to the time when it was at the source, imparting some information then returning it to the time when it arrived at the destination where the information can be extracted.

Of course this requires the ability to move particles between these nanoscopic time domains as/when we want. This will be the biggest hurdle but not one that I see being insurmountable for mankind -- at some stage in the future.

Yes, time-travel will be possible -- but only at a quantum level. However, if we're simply looking to communicate instantly over long distances, that's all we need.

Subspace radio... here we come!

Or I could be wrong :-)

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